From Carnegie: “Linking superconductivity and structure”

Science Springs

Carnegie Institution for Science
Carnegie Institution for Science

May 26, 2015

1The collapsed tetragonal crystal structure of , with arsenic (As) atoms in a 5-fold coordination, courtesy of Alexander Goncharov.

Superconductivity is a rare physical state in which matter is able to conduct electricity—maintain a flow of electrons—without any resistance. It can only be found in certain materials, and even then it can only be achieved under controlled conditions of low temperatures and high pressures. New research from a team including Carnegie’s Elissaios Stavrou, Xiao-Jia Chen, and Alexander Goncharov hones in on the structural changes underlying superconductivity in iron arsenide compounds—those containing iron and arsenic. It is published by Scientific Reports.

Although superconductivity has many practical applications for electronics (including scientific research instruments), medical engineering (MRI machines), and potential future applications including high-performance power transmission and storage, and very fast train travel, the difficulty of creating superconducting materials prevents it from being used to…

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